If You Can Move in It, You Can Fuse in It

New students often call us and ask what they need to wear to class. We say, “Comfortable workout clothes that you can move in.  If you’re wearing shorts… well, be especially careful that those aren’t too loose.”

As a business, we do not give the slightest bit of a damn what brand of clothing you wear to class. If you come to our studio, you’ll note that each of our teachers has her own style – Addie prefers her t-shirts ripped or covered in skulls and tiger stripes, Monica likes to show off that she’s not afraid of color at all, Jocelyn admits that she has a slight Lululemon addiction, and Fuse founder Mariska is known for dressing like a ballet instructor one day and wearing a trendy tank from the sale rack at Target the next. She also sometimes wears her favorite pair of shorts from high school. Seriously.

We’re working on a blog post about teachers’ style, but what about what students think? Do they have preconceptions about a studio’s expectations for their students’ fashion choices?

Fuse Ambassador Lisa Strikowsky gives her take on the culture of fitness clothing in the guest blog post below:

Does this seem like you? Do you think your fitness studio cares about what you wear? If they do, it's time to find a new studio.

“I just joined a gym. I think I’ll go buy some Lululemon pants so that I will fit in”

True story, this was my friend’s Facebook status a few days ago. I saw this and I had to laugh, but then I thought . . . Could this be how others think as well?  Is coming to a Fuse class intimidating to people who feel they don’t have the pre-requisite “uniform”? I never used to think anything of it, I like to be comfortable in the clothes that I work out in, tight-fitting clothes that I can move and breathe in. I never thought the idea of what clothes someone owns would deter him or her from coming to a Fuse class.

However, whether or not we want to admit it, the process of going to the gym, taking a Fuse class, or doing sun salutations at a yoga class, has become a fashion show. You’ve all seen it, the now infamous Omega sign slapped on the back of a brightly colored sports tank, the requisite tight black Capri pants with the slits up the side, the warm up jacket . . . to some of us this uniform says something. What most people think of as just another logo, some see as a status symbol, a symbol that tells others that: Yes! I work out! And Yes, I take pride in my athleticism!

I’ll freely admit it, I spend way too much of my disposable income on these wick-away, breathable, tight fitting capris and sport tanks. Stylish clothes make me feel good about myself – whether I’m going out or working out – and I consider them a well-deserved reward for all of my hard work. But do we really need all this stuff to be better Fuse students?

What's your fitness fashion?

The answer is no. Absolutely not! In order to thrive in a Fuse class, all you need is a good attitude, a willingness to try, and while it is required that you do wear clothing, no one cares what you wear.  You can don your brand-name fitness gear, a six dollar pair of pants from a thrift store, or your dated pink kickball shirt (I’ve seen a lot of these at Fuse Pilates. Fuse teacher Laci McCandless comes to mind). Fuse is an equal opportunity clothing studio. As long as you can move in it, you can Fuse in it.

I’ve been to several studios where yes, what you wore seemed to matter. The attitude of the studio was like a clique. It wasn’t a fun place to be. That’s not the point of finding the workout that works for you.

And as far as that Omega status symbol? In my opinion, the core strength, the toned muscles, the fun you have in class, and that all-around rocking good body, well that’s the only status symbol that a Fuse Pilates student needs. A good pair of pants to accentuate those toned muscles can be icing on the cake – a treat for you to enjoy, but completely irrelevant to the other people in the studio.

-Lisa

 


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